Well, good news!  For any of you who read my blog of Aug 19th, I have found my wayward projects.  They were right there where I put them in the top drawer of the new storage unit I bought, because they were supposed to be the next projects I worked on.  It was not a bad thing though, because I finished the birth sampler I started when I could not find the wayward one and have now carried on working on the one in progress.  I made the mistake of thinking I should work on the tablecloth too, but the lesson I learned from that is not to work on a large project like that in 30 deg weather.  That is definitely a winter project when you need the extra warmth on your legs.
I spent today on a road trip with three other ladies.  We decided to take the ferry from Comox to Powell River to do our part for the economy of the east side of the Strait of Georgia.  One of the ladies, Carol, is a person who does not have unfinished projects.  Seriously, I just did not think there were any such people around, but I have met one.  She constantly teases me about my unfinished Christmas tablecloth.   I made the huge mistake today of telling her about another UFO I have.  In 1979 when one of my sisters was expecting, I decided to knit a sweater for my soon to be niece or nephew.  Now I had done very little knitting before that and have done even less since, but I gave it an honest try.  Three years ago when that niece was expecting, I decided to dig out that half finished sweater and finish it for my soon to be great niece or nephew.  All was going well.  I got some help from some knitter friends to get back on track and was rather proud of the progress I was making, although I didn’t think it looked much like the picture.  Another friend, who coincidently is also a knitter came for a visit one evening as I was working on it.  She asked what I was working on.  I held up the in-progress sweater in one hand and the pattern picture in the other.  As her laughter died, I looked from the picture to the sweater and back several times.  Turns out that as I switched to different sized needles, I went to a larger size rather than the required smaller size to make the sweater bodice.  Who knew that US and UK sizes went in opposite directions?  Certainly not me, a very green knitter.    I put the project back in the bag and replaced it in the trunk from which I had taken it.  Carol kind of smiled at me at the end of the story and said, “why don’t you take it apart and get someone else to knit it?” No.  I couldn’t do that because then it was not Auntie Kathy who had knit it.  Her second solution was, “why don’t you put it in a bag and donate it to the Salvation Army?”  Although this solution sat a little better with me, it still was not what I wanted to do.  So my friends, I will hit the send button on this blog, then I am heading upstairs to take apart that sweater.  I am not sure if I will knit it again or use the wool for something else, or just donate it all to a worthy cause, but 32 years is long enough.  This sweater will no longer be a thorn in my side.

Kathy Taylor

1 comment:

  1. Kathy, I am pleased to learn that there is at least one other person who has no UFOs (though I prefer WIP>> Works in Progress) One member of my Guild does not have any ... she starts and finishes her projects. She is very focused and I guess one would also have to say regimented in her approach to needlework.. thus no WIPs or UFOs! Marie Cron

    ReplyDelete

Find out more at the Embroiderers' Association of Canada website.
EAC is not responsible for content at external links provided within this blog.

About EAC

My photo
The Embroiderers' Association of Canada (EAC) is a national non-profit educational organization whose purpose is to have a fellowship of persons who enjoy needlework and wish to learn and share their knowledge; and thereby to work towards maintaining higher standards of design, colour and workmanship.

Our aim is to preserve traditional techniques and promote new challenges in the Art of Embroidery through education and networking.
Powered by Blogger.

Follow by Email

Search the EAC Blog