Recently I purchased an iPad and it is the greatest. I can get my emails, show off my pictures to friends and access the internet. I have downloaded books to read. How did I live without it?

There is a downside, however, to all this and that is my needlework books. The electronic book will never replace those treasured books that I can hold in my hand and browse through.

For beauty and inspiration Patrick Dowdey’s book, Threads of Light, Chinese Embroidery from Suzhou can’t be beat. The pictures are remarkable.

Then there is Helen Stevens’ The Embroiderer’s Countryside. The embroidery is so delicate. The book truly stimulates the imagination.

I love to look at an old copy of Therese De Dillmont’s Encyclopedia of Needlework.; my copy was inherited by me from a family member who said she got the book in 1920. I look at the vast array of needlework and think that I could never in a lifetime do all of it. The book is a treasure and a window on the past.

Two books that give me great pleasure and ideas to incorporate into my creations are: Jane Nicholas’ Stumpwork & Gold Embroidery and Kreinik, Jacqueline Kreinik’s Metallic Thread Embroidery.

For basic down to earth stitches and some fancy variation on the old traditional stitches I use Peggy Field’s Canvas Embroidery along with Suzanne Howren’s Stitches for Effect & More Stitches for Effect, & Even More Stitches for Effect. Howren’s Stitches to Go is small and easily packed with my needlework so I take it everywhere.

Finally, Jean Taggart’s book Laid Fillings for Evenweave Fabrics has started to come apart and is looking decidedly dog eared but I will never part with it and some of the loose pages even go travelling with me.

The iPad is here to stay but so are the books. I’ll never part with the books.

Carolyn Beacroft         

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The Embroiderers' Association of Canada (EAC) is a national non-profit educational organization whose purpose is to have a fellowship of persons who enjoy needlework and wish to learn and share their knowledge; and thereby to work towards maintaining higher standards of design, colour and workmanship.

Our aim is to preserve traditional techniques and promote new challenges in the Art of Embroidery through education and networking.
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